Caring for Cardinals

Bird lovers find almost every kind of bird interesting. There are about 10, 000 species of birds all over the world. Majority of this figure can be domesticated, and these birds are known to make wonderful pets. And as many of these birds enjoy close contact, those who have decided to take one or more of these birds as pets have enjoyed the company of these interesting, social and cuddly creatures. And there are those that are considered wild birds and are not intended to be kept as pets, including cardinals. But as many of these birds are migratory and might be seen flying over some gardens when the breeding season comes, you might want to find some information on caring for cardinals. This post might just be of help.

Cardinals

Fast Facts About Cardinals

There are a number of interesting facts that make many bird enthusiasts prefer cardinals for a pet than other birds. These birds are more than just beautiful feathers after all.

  1. One of the interesting facts about cardinals is their intelligence. A good display of such features is the fact that these birds are noted to visit feeders first and last. Such a behavior has been predicted to be due to the perceived competition between those times. Ornithologists describe competition during these times to be lower than any other times of the day.

 

  1. There are three true species of these birds — Vermillion, Northern and Desert Cardial. There is a forth species, however, that is also considered a cardinal but is not actually a part of genus Cardinalis and this is the Red Crested Cardinal. Of these types of cardinals, the Northern Cardinal is noted to be the most popular.

 

  1. There is a total of 19 known subspecies of Northern Cardinals, and they are usually identifiable by their colors. The average life span of these birds is about three years. Some can even live for up to about 13 to 15 years. Genus Cardinalis include the following family: Cardinals, Grosbeaks and Buntings.

 

  1. During the cold season, the Northern Cardinals flock together to look for food. In contrast with many other songbirds, the Northern Cardinals are mostly non-migratory. They opt to overwinter in their chosen spring/summer habitat.

 

  1. Northern Cardinals are monogamous and would be seen together with its female throughout the year.

 

  1. Northern Cardinals shed old feathers at least once a year. During this period, you will notice your feathered friend to be losing its feathers and within a couple of weeks will be showing off the dark grey or black skin on its head.

 

  1. Both male and female cardinals sing. The females are noted to have more complex songs than the males, however.

Caring for Cardinals

If you would like to wake up to the singing of these stunning birds, you need to have the right feeders stationed where they may see, feed and rest for a while. (more…)

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Volunteer for Paws

Paws Animal Rescue is operated solely on a volunteer basis. If it wasn’t for all the volunteers that support us, we wouldn’t be able to save as many homeless animals as we do each year.

The new facility at 1530 N Lowell Avenue (behind Walmart off of Airport Road) is staffed part-time on weekdays from 8 to noon. It houses both our available cats and dogs that aren’t being fostered. Volunteers come in at night and on weekends.

The work involves cleaning, socializing, and providing fresh food and water for all. On weekends, we like to have extra volunteers signed up to accomplish everything that needs to be done, plus those to help during open hours.

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Foster a Pet

The shelter occasionally has needs for both cat and dog foster homes. As a foster parent, you take special needs dogs or cats into your home and take care of them until they are adopted or able to return to the shelter. Paws Animal Rescue provides all food, supplies and vet care needed for that specific dog or cat.

Most of our volunteers find volunteering a very rewarding experience. Unfortunately, due to the national problem of pet overpopulation there never are enough volunteers to go around.

INTERESTED?

If you would like to become a foster parent, please contact us by phone or email. Someone will get back to you as soon as possible!

TESTIMONIALS

“Being a foster parent is the most fulfilling & gratifying thing I have ever done.”
~ Betty Truax ~ Foster Home

“I like the opportunity to give the animals a second chance.”
~ Teddi Martell ~ Foster Home

“I would like to help with the fund raising and care at the shelter, but living 30 miles away and running kids everywhere for their activities, I can’t commit to that. So, we have foster cats/kittens at our home. For the most part, they are entertaining and pretty much take care of themselves. My kids do a good job of playing with the cats and helping out with their care. It is something our whole family can volunteer for, and I hope my kids will continue to have animals in their lives when they get older. My grandma always said, ‘People who are nice to animals and know how to treat them well, are good people.’”
~ Joan Hofer ~ Foster Home

“My husband and I have been dog foster parents for three years now, and we are at our supreme happiest when we have a “full house”. We love fostering!! It provides us with a unique way to do something meaningful together. Fostering at our house is a joyful way to ‘give back’ for all that dogs have provided in our lives. Our foster dogs are considered a huge part of our family, even after they leave for their ‘furever’ homes. We are so proud of each dog’s accomplishments, and love each and every one of them so very much. We have five large house dogs of our own, and are always ready at a moment’s notice, for ‘new additions’ in the way of fosters. We see many breeds, and many personalities – every day is an adventure doing what we absolutely love doing!! Try it – you may find it fits just the right place in your heart too!! It really is ‘full time loving’ at its best!!!!!!!”
~ Cat and Larry Johns ~ Foster Home

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What You Should Know

NO SURRENDERS

Paws Animal Rescue is unable to take in surrenders. We are not financially able to handle any more pets than those we receive from the local pounds and law enforcement. Additionally, the animals we take in from the impound process have received all shots/vaccines and (depending on age) have been spayed or neutered, and are given a clean bill of health. It is not in the best interest of these pets to combine them with other animals of questionable health, and we do not have the room or volunteers to care for them separately. If you must find another home for your pet, we suggest you advertise in the media or hang up posters at local businesses. This is the same way we advertise our pets.

ABUSE/NEGLECT

If you know of an animal who is being abused or neglected, call your local law enforcement immediately.

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Form

HOW TO APPLY
  • Download the relevant form above or contact us for a copy.
  • Please mail the completed form along with any applicable fees to:
    Paws Animal Rescue
    P.O. Box 954
    Pierre, SD 57501-0954
  • Alternatively, you can drop them off in person during open hours, or email them to [email protected]
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Adoption Process

If you would like to adopt a loving cat or dog from us, please contact us via phone or email. Tell us what you’re looking for as well as your lifestyle and we’ll suggest some animals which might fit well into your life. Then we’ll set up a time to show you animals we think might be a perfect fit.

STEPS TO ADOPTION
  • Applicants can now fill out the Online Adoption Form, or a three-page adoption application (pdf) must be completed and can be sent to [email protected] or handed in during open hours.
  • We will contact personal and vet references.
  • If you rent, written permission is required from your landlord.
  • You will be observed interacting with the animal.
  • We will ask you general questions.
  • If we feel the cat or dog is right for you, we’ll approve the adoption.

Please remember we are all volunteers and it may take a few days for us to review your application, set up appointments, etc.

ADOPTION FEES

Cats – $85.00 + $5.53 tax = $90.53
Includes: testing for Leukemia & FIV (we don’t take any cats which test positive), Leukemia vaccine, distemper vaccine, rabies vaccine, deworming, Revolution (fleas, ticks, and mites), and spay/neuter.

Dogs – $100.00 + $6.50 tax = $106.50
Includes: Parvo vaccine, rabies vaccine, Bordetella vaccine, deworming, Frontline Plus, and spay/neuter.

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